Graduate Leadership Credential

The Graduate Leadership Credential can be earned by graduate and professional students through participation in leadership programming, the creation of leadership development initiatives and serving as a student leader. Participating students will enhance their communication skills, hone their professionalism, and strengthen their strategic capabilities to better serve their objectives in graduate school and prepare for the transition to post-graduate opportunities.

 

I. LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMMING

To earn the credential, students will be required to participate in two interactive sessions, seminars, or activities in each of the following five content areas:

CONTENT AREAS

  • COMMUNICATION – learn the art of expressing yourself effectively in order to bring your individual or team objectives to fruition.
  • PROFESSIONALISM – develop the skills needed to navigate the world of work and networking, including: how to build professional relationships, time management, and dining do’s and don’ts.
  • LEADERSHIP – influential leaders know how to optimize their strengths, manage limitations, and serve as a key asset to their team; gain the experience necessary to excel.
  • STRATEGY/GOAL SETTING – solidify your personal or team mission, and explore how to make progress toward actualizing your vision.
  • CREATIVITY – engage in discovery; what does it mean to be a creative leader and to design your life?

Programming in each content area will be offered on a semesterly basis to ensure that participating students can make timely progress toward earning the credential, and new programs will be introduced periodically, to meet a variety of student interests as they relate to leadership development. Students completing the credential may also attend programming hosted by campus partners to fulfill three of the ten requirements. Campus partner programming can be utilized for any of the five content areas, but must be preapproved by Deans Macrander and Nguyen via the Program Substitution Form. A list of potential campus partners is provided, below:

CAMPUS PARTNERS

  • Writing Center
  • Teaching Center
  • Postdoctoral Office
  • Center for Diversity & Inclusion
  • WashU Libraries
  • Center for the Humanities
  • Skandalaris Center
  • Career Centers
  • Academic Departments
  • Student Groups
  • Toastmasters

Submit completed action for program participation in any of the above five contents for the Graduate Leadership Credential or Content Proficiency Badge.

(Culminating Experience submission is below)

II. CULMINATING EXPERIENCE

The final requirement of the Graduate Leadership Credential is to complete a culminating experience, which includes both an action and reflection component.

ACTION COMPONENT

The action component of the culminating experience can be completed through one of the following opportunities:

  • GRADUATE STUDENT GROUP – serve on the executive board of a department, school, or university-wide graduate student group
  • GRADUATE STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE TO THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES – serve as one of the two graduate student representatives to the Washington University in St. Louis Board of Trustees; this is a year-long appointment.
  • LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT INITIATIVE – complete a project with appropriate funding from the Liberman Graduate Center’s Leadership Development Initiative.

REFLECTION COMPONENT

The reflection component of the culminating experience can also take one of several forms (detailed below), but in each option students should: (1) cover how the culminating experience has provided the opportunity to employ the skills learned through the content area programming, (2) offer a review of their own leadership style and how they have evolved as a leader through the credential completion process, and (3) identify how earning the credential has contributed to their future goals.

  • IMPACT STATEMENT – a written document, approximately 2,000 words.
  • PRESENTATION – a 45-minute PowerPoint or Prezi presentation.
  • INTERACTIVE TEACHING OPPORTUNITY  – an instructional module on a specialized topic geared toward undergraduates.
  • VIDEO – a five to ten-minute video production

Submit completed application for Culminating Experience with the Graduate Leadership Credential.

III. TRACK YOUR PROGRESS

Students will track credential completion via the Liberman Graduate Center website gradcenter.wustl.edu. All other required documentation can be found on the Graduate Center website as well, including the Program Substitution Form and Professional Opportunity Form.

Students who complete the Graduate Leadership Credential will receive a framed completion document and badges that they can add to their LinkedIn profile. Each badge is hyperlinked to the Liberman Graduate Center webpage where potential employers can view the credential requirements and understand the breadth and depth of training that students have completed. Badges will be awarded through the Badgr website (https://info.badgr.io/).

IV. ALTERNATIVE OPPORTUNITY

Students who may be unable to complete the full Graduate Leadership Credential, or who would like to specialize in a content area can pursue a Content Proficiency badge. This LinkedIn badge will be specific to one of the five content areas and will denote proficiency in that skill. The badge will hyperlink to a page on the Liberman Graduate Center website that provides an explanation of the Content Proficiency badge; learning goals for each content area; and a list of current workshops, seminars, or activities offered.

ACTION COMPONENT

To complete a Content Proficiency badge, students must participate in five programs in the desired content area. Threeprograms must be those offered by the Liberman Graduate Center, and two must be offered by campus partners. For the two sessions offered by campus partners, students must receive preapproval from Deans Macrander and Nguyen via the Program Substitution Form.

Students will also need to complete a practicum, internship, or externship aligned with the content area of their choice (this experience can also be in fulfillment of academic requirements). In order for a professional opportunity to apply toward the Content Proficiency badge, students must receive preapproval (complete the Professional Opportunity form).

REFLECTION COMPONENT

Upon completion of the professional opportunity, students must complete a reflection component. Options for completion are detailed below, but in each option students should: (1) cover how the professional experience has provided the opportunity to employ the skills learned through the content area programming, (2) offer a review of their own leadership style and how they have evolved as a leader through the content proficiency completion process, and (3) identify how earning the content proficiency badge has contributed to their future goals.

  • IMPACT STATEMENT – a written document, approximately 2,000 words.
  • PRESENTATION – a 45-minute PowerPoint or Prezi presentation.
  • INTERACTIVE TEACHING OPPORTUNITY – an instructional module on a specialized topic geared toward undergraduates.
  • VIDEO – a five to ten-minute video production

Submit completed application for Content Proficiency Badge

V. LEARNING GOALS

Below, please find a description of each content area and the associated learning goals. Also identified, are the topics that will complement each content area if you choose to select programs from campus partners to complete the Graduate Leadership Credential.

PROFESSIONALISM

This series of interactive, multidisciplinary seminars is designed for graduate students to identify and build competencies in communicating and collaborating successfully in professional settings. For example, students will

  • Learn about common goals and rules for engagement in “Building Professional Relationships”
  • Practice dining for networking events in “Dining Do’s & Don’ts”
  • Learn to write effective agendas and timelines for sharing agenda items in “How to Run a Meeting & Set a Budget”

FOR PROGRAMMING FROM ON-CAMPUS PARTNERS:

If you’d like to attend programming from an on-campus partner, these topics would complement the Professionalism series:

  • Team engagement
  • Networking
  • Collaboration
  • Conflict resolution

COMMUNICATION

This series of activities is designed for graduate students to learn how to effectively and succinctly communicate about their research and professional interests, as well as how to navigate workplace communication particularly via e-mail. For example, students will:

  • Learn how to describe their research and professional goals to a general audience
  • Practice their “elevator speech” and presentation skills
  • Gain experience speaking to senior leadership about interdisciplinary subjects related to students’ academic, professional, and leadership interests
  • Learn how to translate information into individual opportunities through communicating with changemakers

 FOR PROGRAMMING FROM ON-CAMPUS PARTNERS:

If you’d like to attend programming from an on-campus partner, these topics would complement the Communication series:

  • Public speaking skills
  • Networking
  • Professional correspondence

STRATEGY/GOAL SETTING

This series of interactive, multidisciplinary 90-minute seminars is designed for graduate students to identify frameworks for defining goals that can be achieved, developing a plan to achieve the goal, and engage in the process of tracking and revising goals. For example, students will:

  • Determine how their personal interests, strengths, values, and skills inform intentional career decision-making in “Individual Development Plan”
  • Learn principles for setting achievable goals
  • Learn frameworks for time and project management from proven leaders

FOR PROGRAMMING FROM ON-CAMPUS PARTNERS:

If you’d like to attend programming from an on-campus partner, these topics would complement the Strategy/Goal Setting series:

  • Strategic Thinking
  • Strategic Planning
  • Mapping your academic year
  • Project management

LEADERSHIP

This series of activities and opportunities is designed for graduate students to learn about multiple leadership styles, identify their own leadership strengths, and gain experience supporting and engaging diverse constituencies. For example, students will:

  • Complete individual inventories designed to provide the language students need to communicate about their leadership strengths
  • Plan, execute, and evaluate programming designed for students, faculty, and staff
  • Learn about leadership as a discipline, including how various styles, approaches, and inclusive practices can result in strong teams that achieve their short-term and long-term goals

FOR PROGRAMMING FROM ON-CAMPUS PARTNERS:

If you’d like to attend programming from an on-campus partner, these topics would complement the Leadership series:

  • Active leadership opportunities
  • Program planning, execution, and evaluation
  • Leadership styles/approaches
  • How to engage others
  • Individual inventories

CREATIVITY

This series of activities and seminars is designed for graduate students to learn how the process of discovery in innovation and entrepreneurship relates to leadership, design thinking, and how creative leadership can catalyze transformation in individuals and teams. For example, students will:

  • Serve as a member of an interdisciplinary team in innovation and entrepreneurship challenges
  • Identify how to use design thinking to positively impact your own development and solve leadership challenges
  • Learn why a leadership style isn’t one size fits all, and how creativity in leadership can inspire

FOR PROGRAMMING FROM ON-CAMPUS PARTNERS:

If you’d like to attend programming from an on-campus partner, these topics would complement the Creativity series:

  • Innovation and entrepreneurship
  • Discovery
  • Creativity in leadership styles/approaches
  • Design thinking