Implementation Plans

mentored experience(s)

Anthropology

currently under review

Mentored Teaching Experience [LGS 600]

required number of semesters: 5
updated: 07.2017

Mentored Professional Experience [LGS 603]

currently under review

Art History & Archaeology

required number of semesters: 6
updated: 09.2017

Mentored Teaching Experience [LGS 600]

Role of Teaching in the Discipline of Art History & Archaeology  

Preparing our students to teach, as well as to be engaged and effective public speakers, is an important part of the departmental mission. Graduate MTEs in our large courses are observed by the instructors of record and given feedback at least once each time the course is taught; they are offered opportunities to guest lecture in these large classes; and many of them opt to create a teaching portfolio that organizes their experience in the classroom for use when they do go on the job market. Our students also have opportunities to teach their own courses; the learning experience for our students is vital.

Pedagogical Preparation

Our department runs a WIPS program (Works in Progress Series) each semester, to which all grad students are strongly encouraged to attend. Here, students giving conference papers vet their work to the entire department and get valuable feedback.  WIPS also includes several sessions a year covering various aspects of professionalization, from writing and formatting CVs, to circulating manuscripts for publication, Grants and Fellowships (narrative format), alternative careers.  Our students routinely receive the Dean's prize in graduate instruction and receive high marks from undergrads.

Sequence of Teaching Opportunities for PhD Students

Three years of MTE in one of our large gateway courses (Introduction to Western Art; Introduction to Modern Art And Design (IMAAD); and Introduction to Asian Art), or in one of our other courses enrolling large numbers.

Mentored Professional Experience [LGS 603]

currently under review

Biomedical Engineering

required number of semesters: 1
updated: 07.2017

Mentored Teaching Experience [LGS 600]

Role of Teaching in the Discipline of Biomedical Engineering  

We are educating students for careers in industry, in government, and in academia with a concentration on research. Therefore, it is important that our graduates know how to convey technical knowledge in both lecture and interactive settings to a wide audience (from peers in the field to trainees with a limited understanding of the nuances of the topic).

Pedagogical Preparation

All PhD candidates will be required to complete the MTE orientation in a student’s second year of doctoral studies and two approved workshops offered by the Teaching Center by the end of the third year of doctoral studies.

Sequence of Teaching Opportunities for PhD Students

All BME PhD students are required to have a Mentored Teaching Experience (MTE) for at least one-semester, documented by registering for Mentored Teaching Experience LGS 600 24. This is typically completed during the second year of doctoral training. Students may fulfill this requirement in many ways including:

  • Giving lectures in undergraduate classes;
  • Conducting discussion sessions in undergraduate classes;
  • Conducting recitation sessions in undergraduate classes;
  • Giving lectures in laboratory courses that introduce or interpret the experiments
  • Running help sessions in which the graduate student explains the background and methodology of engineering approaches (involving a lesson plan);
  • Holding office hours;
  • Grading assignments or exams

Students are also required to deliver a minimum of four oral presentations at journal clubs, seminars, scientific conferences, and retreats. Presentations given as part of the MTE, lab meetings or thesis committee meetings will not satisfy this requirement. The student's mentor will approve the four oral presentations.

Mentored Professional Experience [LGS 603]

currently under review

Business

required number of semesters: 8
updated: 07.2017

Mentored Teaching Experience

Role of Teaching in the Discipline of Biomedical Engineering  

Our mission at Olin Business School is to foster future leaders and researchers who create knowledge, inspire individuals and transform business. The PhD Program is dedicated to developing PhD Candidates who are attractive for faculty positions at our peer institutions. We aim to train our students not only in advanced research methods and seminal knowledge in the fields of their choice but also the ability to effectively teach students at all levels in a business school.  This requires proficiency in the current business environment and practices, as well as, an ability to apply and communicate cutting edge research when addressing complex business issues. Ultimately the students we train should be able to communicate this effectively in the classroom. We accomplish this by having students receive mentorship as Assistants in Instruction receive for graduate and undergraduate courses requiring them to attend a variety of pedagogical sessions and workshops, and asking them to present seminars to faculty and peers several times in the course of their program. And when possible, having them either co-teach or teach independently a course to undergraduate students of Business Administration.

Pedagogical Preparation
  1. Participation in a teaching preparation seminar, instructional workshop, internship or course that addresses course design and classroom facilitation. (i.e. Teaching Center workshops and required orientation)
  2. Participation in at least one communication seminar, instructional workshop or course that addresses communication and presentation skills and includes classroom instruction to an undergraduate or master’s level audience. (B53 660 Seminar in Presentation Skills is required for 3rd year students)
  3. Annual presentations to the faculty members in the chosen area of studies, beginning in the second year of the doctoral program. (Second year students are required to present their summer paper in the fall of their third year. Additional presentations happen each year, including the job market paper presentation in the 5th year.)
  4. Students must present a working paper at a conference, job-market seminar or consortium prior to graduation.
Sequence of Teaching Opportunities for PhD Students

Opportunities for independent teaching (as an adjunct instructor) are determined by each area. Typically, this is only available for 5th and 6th-year students.

Mentored Professional Experience [LGS 603]

currently under review

Chemistry

required number of semesters: 4
updated: 09.2017

Mentored Teaching Experience [LGS 600]

Role of Teaching in the Discipline of Chemistry  

Science and teaching are intimately connected in chemistry since a research result or finding is only useful if it can be communicated and coherently explained to both knowledgeable and general audiences.  Furthermore, it is imperative that future teachers know how to adapt their teaching styles to include new findings into the curriculum and to utilize new teaching methods and techniques into the classroom. PhD chemists in industry must know how to effectively communicate findings and proposals to superiors as a key component in securing funding for their group’s efforts. As a result, the Chemistry Department continuously places a focus on teaching and communication at all levels of its PhD program, starting with mentored teaching experiences (MTEs) associated with courses and research group meetings, progressing towards formal presentations and peer mentoring, and culminating with developing and defending original ideas and research results.

It is an academic requirement that all Chemistry PhD students must participate in an MTE as an assistant in instruction (AI) for four semesters. The time commitment for a typical AI experience in Chemistry is 12 hours per week. The specific courses and AI opportunities that students engage in are tailored to their field of study within Chemistry and shaped by their career aspirations, their strengths and weaknesses as communicators, and their previous AI experiences. Most students begin with a MTE in General Chemistry Laboratory or Organic Chemistry Laboratory courses. The roles of the graduate students in these courses vary depending on their experience levels, their proven mastery of the material and communication, and, to some extent, their chosen career path. A number of graduate students also request to be an AI as a recitation leader, which typically combines presentation with problem-solving sessions, and is set in more of a classroom environment. Many of the skills in this MTE environment are unique from the laboratory environment, thereby solidifying additional skill sets for PhD students.

Education in teaching in Chemistry is not limited to AI experiences.  All of our students give annual formal presentations to a thesis committee, comprised of at least three faculty members, including their advisor. These committee meetings serve multiple goals. First, they ensure satisfactory progress towards the completion of the PhD dissertation in a timely manner. Secondly, students give a 30-45 minute formal presentation of their research findings; this is truly a MTE. The students must carefully construct their presentations with specific goals and often with the need for presenting difficult concepts in multiple, complementary ways. In addition, most of our students also partake in formal Journal Clubs for at least two years (Chem 515 (Biological Chemistry Seminar), Chem 540 (Inorganic Chemistry Seminar), Chem 559 (Organic Chemistry Seminar)). In these seminar courses, each student must summarize the findings in a recent journal article and critically evaluate the results to the other students and seminar leader. This can be a challenging MTE since the topics can become quite detailed, and the breadth and research interests in the participating students and faculty are diverse. Students in the department also participate in Research Group Meetings where they prepare lectures on literature topics, their own research efforts, or both on a frequent basis. All of these lecture experiences provide students with further MTEs, including departmental seminars, presenting at regional and national scientific meetings, as well as visits to other institutions and interviewing for jobs.

Pedagogical Preparation

All incoming Chemistry PhD students begin orientation and their MTE education at least two weeks prior to the traditional Arts & Sciences Graduate Student Orientation each August. During this time, students are instructed on laboratory safety and emergency preparedness, a must for all chemists, especially those pursuing a PhD. In addition, the students participate in extensive learning opportunities in preparation for their MTEs and roles as an AI, which is largely led by the General Chemistry and Organic Chemistry Lecture and Laboratory Lecturers and the Director of the Teaching Center. During this time, students are educated with best practices for lecturing in different environments, for developing lectures, for facilitating group discussions, for effectively leading group projects, for the utilization of multimedia in the classroom, for interacting with students, for grading and evaluating student writing, and for maintaining a safety environment in the laboratory and the classroom. During this orientation, students are required to give a short lecture, which is recorded and attended by a small group of faculty, lecturers, and staff. After viewing the lecture, the students are critiqued and coached on how to improve their lecture styles.

The students also spend several afternoons before the Fall and Spring semesters participating in laboratory-specific education and laboratory-experiment practicum. These sessions are led by the Laboratory Directors with assistance from the Director of the Teaching Center and solidify the topics presented to the incoming PhD students. The MTEs also meet weekly with the instructors of the courses for which they are assisting, to discuss the current topics and expectations, grading assignments, student progress, and questions relating to the material.

Serving as an AI in an even higher level course requires different skill sets than offered by the typical MTE. In part, because of the need for additional practice in presenting and teaching, the Chemistry Department requires PhD students to give at least one thesis committee meeting annually – after the completion of the Dissertation Research Proposal Defense requirement, which is in the third semester of residence. The students are given verbal feedback on their presentation styles from the research advisor and written comments from their entire committee. Most students will also participate in a Journal Club seminar series (Chem 515, 540, or 559). The students are graded on the quality of their presentations and are given additional feedback from the multiple faculty members in attendance.

Lastly, all of the research groups in Chemistry have weekly, or near-weekly, group meetings. Because of the collaborative nature of the research in the Chemistry Department, many of these group meetings are held jointly with the members of numerous research groups attending. The presentation formats in these group meetings vary, sometimes resembling informal discussion sessions, and other are formal presentations. These experiences represent valuable MTEs that strengthens the students’ skill sets at all educational levels.

Sequence of Teaching Opportunities for PhD Students

All Chemistry PhD students must fulfill the following two MTE requirements within six years of full-time residence in the graduate program.

  1. Fundamental MTEs: Each PhD student in Chemistry must participate in four semesters as an A Students are encouraged to serve as AIs in different classes, but the Chemistry faculty realizes that graduate students also benefit from the opportunity to participate in the same experience again. This offers the students the chance to take their feedback, optimize their styles, and improve their educational and presentation skills. The graduate students will receive both general and course-specific mentoring prior to the beginning of the course. The AIs will also be given feedback and instruction from the course instructor on a regular basis throughout the semester. Each AI receives feedback in the form of student evaluations and a final summary evaluation from the course instructor at the end of the semester.
  2. Advanced MTEs: Each PhD student must complete at least five advanced MTEs. These advanced teaching experiences do not have to be distinctly different from each other and may include any of the following:
    1. Performing as an AI in an advanced course. Advanced courses that satisfy this obligation include: Chem 358, Chem 401, Chem 402, Chem 435, Chem 445, Chem 451, Chem 461, Chem 470, Chem 481, or Chem 482.
    2. Performing as an AI in a lecture course such as Chem 111, Chem 112, Chem 261, or Chem 262.
    3. Presenting a departmental seminar.
    4. Holding a thesis committee meeting.
    5. Presenting research findings at a group meeting.
    6. Presenting research findings at a national or regional science meeting.
    7. Participating in any of the Teaching Workshops offered by the Washington University Teaching Center

Mentored Professional Experience [LGS 603]

currently under review

Classics

required number of semesters: 8
updated: 05.2017

Mentored Teaching Experience [LGS 600]

Role of Teaching in the Discipline of Classics  

Teaching and pedagogical training are at the heart of Classics and Classics graduate education. Virtually all Classicists, regardless of the subfield, are expected to be able to teach a range of classes in Latin, Ancient Greek, and Greco-Roman civilization and literature. Even at the most prestigious research universities, tenured faculty teach the ancient languages at all levels and teach larger courses on Greco-Roman civilization designed to draw in new students. Moreover, many graduates of Classics MA and PhD programs choose to enter careers in secondary teaching, and experience in teaching during the graduate program is a huge asset. The field of Classics pedagogical studies is vibrant, and the bibliography on Classics pedagogy - including explanations of new trends and tools - growing every day. Classicists across North America are well-connected by pedagogical journals, conferences, websites, and blogs.  Faculty at research universities, liberal arts colleges, and secondary schools alike contribute to the field of pedagogy.

Pedagogical Preparation

Besides the individual mentoring that every course assistant will receive (see below), the department:

  1. Offers a required seminar on Classics Pedagogy, taught every two to three years and open to both PhD and MA students in the department; students read and discuss a large amount of contemporary pedagogical publications and learn about the history of the field, and they complete several assignments with immediate practical value (mock lessons, teaching dossiers)
  2. Encourages students to take advantage of other training opportunities (e.g. Teaching Center workshops; conversations with visiting scholars with pedagogical expertise)
  3. Encourages students to undertake one-off or short-term teaching gigs in the area (e.g. our department's outreach sessions with local schools; U College's Summer Challenge for local students; Institute of Reading Development; opportunities to guest lecture) and mentors them as they prepare
Sequence of Teaching Opportunities for PhD Students

Required: 8 semesters of Mentored Teaching Experiences total, in the second through fifth years.

Includes:

  1. 2 to 6 semesters of MTEs as a course assistant, in which graduate assistants will attend all class meetings, hold office hours, assist in grading, (sometimes) give a lecture, and (sometimes) teach weekly discussion sections. The faculty teaching said courses hold weekly meetings with assistants to discuss the agenda and any issues, observe assistants teaching discussion sections at some point in the semester, and write up a performance review of each assistant for the department.
  2. (following an appropriate number of MTEs as an assistant) a minimum of 2 semesters of MTEs as Instructor of Record. These assignments will include some language teaching (100 to 300 level courses) to ensure that graduate students have experience in this area by the time of degree. The design of these courses is very consistent over the years, so graduate instructors will have a tradition to draw on. Assignments may also include courses in culture/history/literature in translation, again normally in areas traditionally taught in the department, but where appropriate allowing the instructor to design his/her own course. The graduate instructors will be mentored by the department chair and DGS in their syllabus planning, textbook selection, etc., and will be observed 3 times over the semester by 3 different faculty members. Written reports on these observations will be shared with both the department and the graduate instructor.

Mentored Professional Experience [LGS 603]

currently under review

Comparative Literature

required number of semesters: 4
updated: 11.2018

Mentored Teaching Experience [LGS 600]

Role of Teaching in the Discipline of Comparative Literature

Training in teaching is critical for students in the Comparative Literature PhD program who plan to enter the American academy after the completion of their degree. Comparative Literature PhDs on this career trajectory may find employment within a Comparative Literature program or department or they may be hired in a national language and literature program, a performing arts or theater department, or in area studies programs. Some of our students pursue non-academic careers after graduate, sometimes in closely related fields such as publishing.  The training of all our students must be tailored to make them maximally prepared and flexible so that they can rise to the teaching challenges of variously configured programs and departments and of the general education requirements of the various kinds of postsecondary institutions as well as those of alternative careers.  In an academic job interview they will likely be asked questions about teaching. A teaching demonstration will, furthermore, likely be a part of an on-campus interview and thus critical in the hiring process.  In an interview for an alternative career path they would likely be asked to translate their experience at the university into the language, goals, and demands of other sectors. It must, however, be made clear that many of our students are international, have developing English skills, and may not live and work in the American context and that they will need time to adjust to our teaching and learning environment. Our thinking about their training has to be thoughtfully flexible.

Pedagogical Preparation

In addition to practical classroom training and interaction with faculty in pedagogical matters, Comparative Literature students gain practical experience in communicating ideas and argumentation in the following ways:

  1. Discussion-based seminars with formal oral presentations (all of the seminars that students take in Comparative Literature are in this format and thus place special emphasis on oral argumentation and communication of ideas).
  2. Participation in the annual graduate student works-in-progress sessions. These events give students the opportunity to present their work formally and publicly to faculty and peers.
  3. Conference participation in venues other than Washington University.  With the help of the Graduate School, Comparative Literature funds travel to conferences. Every CL PhD student participates in at least one conference (and likely more) before graduation.
  4. Reading groups, sponsored by the Center for the Humanities. In these venues too students have the opportunity to formulate and exchange ideas.

Finally, we encourage our students to take advantage of pedagogy workshops and career workshops that take place on campus and, where appropriate, to take advantage of the resources of the Teaching Center, including the Teaching Citation, and the Graduate School.

Sequence of Teaching Opportunities for PhD Students

We require a minimum of four semesters and a maximum of eight semesters of mentored teaching or equivalent professional training. Most students will likely complete 6-8 semesters of mentored teaching to gain deep and broad experience to prepare for today’s market. Some, especially those headed for non-academic careers, will likely complete only the minimum. In any case, one size does not fit all in our diverse program and some tailoring will take place for each student. What follows is a template that will always require adjustment.

All students who have a concentration in a national language and literature will ordinarily begin their training in one of our sister departments consisting of a pedagogy course and on-the-job training. For example, a student with an English concentration might begin with a mentored teaching experience in the English Composition program in the fall semester followed by a second such experience in the spring semester.  A student of Japanese would, for example, take the pedagogy course in Japanese and enroll simultaneously in a mentored teaching experience in Japanese language instruction and so forth. The point of such mentored teaching experiences in foreign language instruction is that the students acquire training equivalent to PhD students home based in those PhD programs so that they are prepared to teach in such departments (where most Comparative Literature students in the American academy are eventually hired). It is advisable in most cases of foreign language teacher training for students to gain at least four semesters of mentored teaching experience in this way, rotating through several levels of language teaching. We depend on our sister departments to help us in this endeavor.

After students complete their training and experience in these departments, we would ordinarily provide them with a different kind of mentored teaching experience. This experience would involve teaching literature, film, drama, etc., in English (translation) at various levels both within the Comparative Literature program and in sister departments.  Ideally the first mentored teaching experience will consist of placement in a course in which the student, following a student-teacher model, is able to observe first and then gradually to be integrated into active co-teaching in the course in both discussion and lecture formats. The student will also assist (and be instructed) in grading papers, planning lessons, assembling supplementary AV material, using digital media, and in assembling tests and writing prompts. We stress that co-teaching in our usage here is mentored teaching and always occurs under the supervision of the faculty member in charge of the course. Student responsibilities vary somewhat depending on the nature and size of the course in question.  On very rare occasions students may have the opportunity to teach Comparative Literature 215 more independently, but nevertheless, under the close mentorship of faculty.

Each semester all student-teachers will be observed and will receive feedback. A report from their faculty mentor will be placed in their file.  Under our MTE system, students will have the opportunity to work with good role models and to exchange ideas with faculty, to implement best practices in the classroom, and to find their own teaching style.

To help students monitor their own professional development as teachers, we review these goals with them periodically and annually take stock of their experience with a worksheet in which they detail their teacher training, teaching experiences, and goals.  All students participating in mentored teaching experiences are evaluated both by students and by their faculty mentors.

Mentored Professional Experience [LGS 603]

Opportunities for Mentored Professional Experiences

Teacher training cultivates capacities and skills that support alternative careers. Nevertheless, in some cases, it will be important to enhance graduate education with MPEs (Mentored Professional Experiences). To enhance our students’ preparation for non-academic careers after they complete our program, we, therefore, permit students, in consultation with the Director of Comparative Literature, to substitute MPEs for MTEs. The number and nature of these MPEs will be determined in consultation with the Director and will not exceed eight.

Computer Science & Engineering

required number of semesters: 1-2
updated: 08.2017

Mentored Teaching Experience [LGS 600]

Role of Teaching in the Discipline of Computer Science and Engineering

Teaching is a fundamental responsibility for PhD graduates pursuing faculty positions in Computer Science and Computer Engineering. CSE faculty at first-class research institutions are expected to teach at least one course per semester. In more teaching-focused schools, the teaching load may be three or four courses per semester. Even for graduates entering an industrial rather than a university career, there may be opportunities to teach workshops or courses internal to their organization. Beyond this fundamental requirement, graduates who remain active in CSE research will frequently present

their research in highly competitive academic conferences, at invited colloquia (including job talks), and in other public forums.

The mission of the CSE Department in graduate teaching training is twofold. First, we will provide all doctoral students with sufficient teaching training and practicum to enable them to compete for, and to succeed in, CSE faculty positions at top research institutions. This training is also sufficient for students who choose to pursue careers in industry. Students interested in pursuing positions primarily as teaching faculty will have the opportunity for enhanced teaching training and practicum to support their ambitions. Second, we will train all doctoral students in the standards of scholarly oral communication needed to succeed in CSE research. This training will take place through individual mentoring by faculty and peers, through observation and critique of other speakers, and through students’ presentations in internal and external scholarly forums.

Pedagogical Preparation
Scholarly Communication Training

CSE doctoral students are trained in scholarly communication through individual mentoring by faculty coupled with a variety of speaking opportunities that include feedback from faculty and other students. There are three principal ways in which CSE doctoral students obtain experience in scholarly communication:  faculty-organized research seminars, Doctoral Student Seminars, and external presentations at academic conferences and workshops.

  1. CSE research seminars typically have a journal club-like format, in which students take turns presenting papers from current literature. All CSE doctoral students must complete at least three of these seminars and so must typically prepare at least three seminar talks of 40-60 minutes each.
  2. Doctoral Student Research Seminars are a weekly event, organized by the CSE Graduate Student Association, at which students present talks of 20-25 minutes on their current research and receive feedback on their talks from other students and faculty. Doctoral students are required to present in DSS at least once per year that they are active in research unless they are proposing or defending their dissertation in a given year. We require students to have given at least two talks in DSS by the time they graduate, and students admitted Fall 2015 and later are required to give at least one talk that is judged to be “outstanding” by the faculty evaluating that talk. If for any reason it is not possible to give two DSS talks prior to graduation, that person can request that some other research talk, such as an external conference presentation, be substituted for each missing DSS talk. All doctoral students are expected to attend other talks in the DSS, observe various speakers, and complete critique forms giving them the opportunity to learn through observation and discussion.
  3. Finally, doctoral students active in research typically give one to several external conference presentations per year on their work. Conferences in CSE are peer-reviewed and highly competitive, with typically less than a third (and often less than a fifth) of submitted research papers being accepted for presentation and publication. External research talk opportunities will depend on the volume and quality of the student’s research.

In addition to providing ongoing mentoring and feedback on students’ speaking skills, the Department conducts one major early milestone, the Oral Qualifying Exam that tests these skills. Doctoral students must pass this exam, usually in the first or second year of study, as part of their PhD qualifying requirements. The exam requires the student to prepare a technical talk of 35-40 minutes on an area of current CSE research, based on papers from the current literature; to present this talk before a committee of faculty, and to answer the committee’s questions on the substance of the talk and related literature. All students, but especially those who fail and must try again, receive feedback from the committee on the strengths and weaknesses of their talks. Individual mentoring of students by faculty and peers usually takes the form of practice talks for external speaking opportunities. These talks are conducted within individual research groups, which provide detailed feedback to help improve the talk.

Basic Pedagogy Training

CSE doctoral students admitted Fall 2017 and later are required to complete pedagogical training from two sources:

  1. The University-Wide, Graduate Student Teaching Orientation held at the beginning of the fall semester.
  2. The teaching workshop offered by the CSE Department in collaboration with other SEAS departments.

*Students admitted prior to Fall 2017 may choose to complete three workshops offered by the Teaching Center in place of the CSE Department teaching workshop

Mentored Teaching Experience

The Mentored Teaching Experience (MTE) is designed to give students practical experience of teaching a course while under the close guidance and mentorship of an experienced faculty member. The experience consists of a minimum of 14 hours of contact with students and will also typically require about 10 hours per week of participation in course administration such as grading assignments, answering students’ questions online, and other such duties as assigned by the course instructor. The 14 contact hours are organized into two levels.

Level 1

At least 4 hours of lecture, traditional recitation section, lab section, or structured studio. The defining features are that (a) the MTE student must prepare and plan the session in advance, and (b) the MTE student must be in charge of a group of 3 or more students engaged in some form of planned, structured learning experience. The MTE student should record the names of the students in attendance. Office hours or 1-on-1 help do not satisfy this requirement. If the student engages in more than 4 hours of this activity, the additional hours can count toward the Level 2 requirement.

Level 2 

At least 10 hours of some combination of (a) and (b) below: (a) Helping students 1-on-1, in person. These can be in scheduled office hours or ad hoc meetings. The MTE student should record the names of the students he or she helped and the approximate time spent. Or, (b) Designing and grading significant new assignments and writing a one-page reflection on how they went, including strengths and weaknesses. The reflection should be turned in to and discussed with the mentor in charge of the course. Hours devoted to either (a) or (b) can be combined to satisfy the requirement.

The total time commitment for the MTE should be similar to that of a 3-unit course, i.e. not more than about 12-14 hours per week, on average. However, the time required may vary significantly from week to week

Sequence of Teaching Opportunities for PhD Students

During their first year, students are expected to attend the DSS series, observe the talks, and provide constructive feedback. This prepares them to give a talk of their own during their second year.  They are then tested on their ability to present results in a scholarly and professional oral presentation and to answer questions orally. This oral qualification exam should take place no later than the end of the second year. While a large portion of the scholarly communication training occurs within the first and second year, it is an ongoing component of a doctoral student’s program as they continue to improve their speaking skills by giving additional DSS talks, attending other talks in the series, and going on to present at external conferences.

Students are encouraged to attend both pedagogical training workshops immediately before completing their MTE. This will give them immediate and relevant training that they can then apply directly to their teaching experience. Most students should complete their MTE during their second, third, or fourth year.

Mentored Professional Experience [LGS 603]

currently under review

Division of Biology & Biomedical Sciences

required number of semesters: 1
updated: 05.2017

Mentored Teaching Experience [LGS 600]

Role of Teaching in the Discipline of Biology and Biomedical Sciences

Effective communication of information and concepts is a critical skill for biomedical research scientists. While much of the teaching that scientists engage in is through one-on-one interactions with individuals in the laboratory, all scientists must be able to deliver lectures to a wide audience (from peers in the field to neophytes with a limited understanding of the nuances of the topic), and scientists in faculty positions will often teach courses to undergraduate and graduate students. Therefore, DBBS students must demonstrate the ability to effectively communicate complex ideas and concepts to groups of individuals at various levels of understanding.

Pedagogical Preparation

Prior to beginning their Mentored Teaching Experience, DBBS students will be required to complete the Graduate Student Teaching Orientation and a minimum of three 90-minute teaching workshops, each covering a different topic, offered by the Teaching Center. Individualized instruction and mentoring will be provided by the course master of the class they have been assigned to. The course master will provide feedback throughout the semester and will complete an evaluation upon the completion of the Mentored Teaching Experience. If the course master determines that the student’s facility with essential

teaching skills is unsatisfactory, the student will be counseled by the course master and the Associate Dean of Graduate Education and will complete another Mentored Teaching Experience to attain mastery of these skills.

Sequence of Teaching Opportunities for PhD Students

Teaching experience will consist of two components: basic and advanced. In the basic component, the DBBS student will serve as a mentored teaching trainee in a course designated by the Associate Dean. The mentored teaching training must incorporate at least one of the following activities: delivering lectures, leading lab demonstrations, or conducting review sessions for groups of students. (Grading exams or papers, holding office hours, one-on-one tutoring, etc., may also be components of the teaching experience, but they are not sufficient to meet the DBBS teaching training requirement.) Mentored teaching opportunities will be reviewed annually to ensure that the experience meets the requirements established in this policy. The basic component of the Mentored Teaching Experience can be supplemented by lectures or appropriate teaching activity associated with other courses, as approved by the Assoc. Dean for Graduate Education (amended, Aug. 2012)

The advanced component consists of presenting ideas and concepts to groups of individuals who are not necessarily expert in the student’s particular research niche. DBBS students will satisfy this component by presenting papers at journal clubs and delivering talks at scientific meetings, conferences and retreats. The trainee’s thesis mentor will provide guidance and feedback to trainees engaged in the advanced component. (This requirement will not be satisfied by presenting one’s work at lab meetings, thesis update meetings, or at the thesis examination.)

Mentored Professional Experience [LGS 603]

currently under review

Earth & Planetary Sciences

currently under review

Mentored Teaching Experience [LGS 600]

required number of semesters: 
updated: 05.2017

Mentored Professional Experience [LGS 603]

currently under review

East Asian Languages & Cultures

required number of semesters: 6-8
updated: 07.2017

Mentored Teaching Experience [LGS 600]

Role of Teaching in the Discipline of East Asian Languages & Cultures

Given the intense competition in the current academic job market (for which nearly all of EALC students prepare), it is imperative that our students acquire sound training in pedagogy and extensive teaching experience under the supervision of our faculty. PhD students in EALC are expected to assist in teaching a wide array of courses in language, literature, and culture and are carefully mentored in the preparation and practice of excellent teaching, including course development, lecturing, leading discussions, student guidance and the evaluation of students’ work.

Pedagogical Preparation
Advanced professional communication training

In addition to their experiences in the classroom, students in an EALC PhD program are expected to take advantage of opportunities for professional development appropriate to their level in the program. Such opportunities include the following:

  1. Active participation in symposia, seminars, and lectures organized by the department or elsewhere on campus, including opportunities the department arranges for graduate students to interact with visiting speakers.
  2.  Participation (paper presentation, panel organization) in regional and national conferences, such as the Midwest Conference on Asian Affairs, or annual graduate-student-organized conferences (Columbia University, Harvard University, University of Colorado-Boulder, etc.), as well as yearly participation in the symposia or workshops sponsored by the Comparative Literature Program. In advance of conference presentations, the candidate works with at least one senior faculty member to ensure clarity and coherence of the text, to practice delivery speed and style, and to finalize the use of slides, handouts, and explanations. Students are also encouraged to contact the Writing Center on campus and work with tutors there and/or the Speaking Studio on presentational skills. Note that the department will typically offer assistance with conference travel twice during each student’s time in the program. Students are also eligible to apply for GS dissertation travel funds when they are ABD.
  3. Participation in fellow students’ conference paper presentation practice sessions, dissertation prospectus presentations, and mock job talks.
  4. Seeking out and applying for outside funding for dissertation research abroad, dissertation write up, language study, and so on, and applying for relevant prizes.
  5. Involvement in organizing TEA talks, EALC forum or other events.
  6. Participation in career development workshops and programs through the Career Center.
Sequence of Teaching Opportunities for PhD Students

Within the eight required mentored teaching experiences, normally each student will:

  • Assist in the language program for at least two semesters. Note, however, that most students should plan to complete additional MTEs in a language in order to gain experience teaching at both beginning and intermediate or advanced levels.
  • Assist with the 200-level civilization course in their major field at least once, and offer at least one lecture in addition to evaluating student work, meeting with students about questions and problems, and other responsibilities as determined in consultation with the lead instructor.
  • Assist with the appropriate literature survey course in their major field at least once, leading at least 1-2 lecture/discussion sessions. Prior to these sessions, the assistant to the instructor will submit a lesson plan to the lead instructor for approval. The assistant will also assist with evaluating student work, meeting with students about questions and problems, and other responsibilities as determined in consultation with the lead instructor.
  • Assist with a course outside their country of specialization or in a different discipline at least once, with responsibilities to be determined in consultation with lead instructor.

All assistants to an instructor are carefully monitored and provided with ongoing mentoring. At the conclusion of each mentored teaching experience, the mentor will provide a written evaluation of the student’s teaching, followed by a one-on-one-discussion.

Additional notes:

  • Students may be excused from registering for LGS 600 in one of the eight semesters if they are engaging in research or language study abroad under an approved plan.
  • Teaching opportunities will typically proceed in sequence as given above, but variations are possible depending on individual students’ prior teaching experience, aptitude, and interests, as well as on the availability of suitable courses and mentors in a particular semester.
  • Students who have completed six or more MTEs and at least three workshops through the Teaching Center may, depending upon curricular needs and availability of department funds, be invited to offer a class either individually or with another advanced graduate student as a part-time instructor under the guidance of a mentor. The graduate student(s) will submit a course proposal (if a new course) and syllabus to the mentor for approval.   The mentor will oversee the ordering of course books, assignments, and the evaluation of student work. The mentor will also visit the class during the semester, at least once before the midterm, and once after. Each time the mentor will offer a written and oral critique of the graduate student’s teaching. The mentor will ensure that students in the class provide the graduate student instructor with midterm and end-of-term evaluations.
  • Students who offer a class as a part-time instructor will be excused from one of the required MTEs. Thus, while eight MTEs is the standard requirement, a student who teaches independently during one semester and conducts research abroad on an approved plan during another may acceptably complete only six MTEs during his or her time in the program.

Mentored Professional Experience [LGS 603]

currently under review

Economics

required number of semesters: 2-6
updated: 09.2017

Mentored Teaching Experience [LGS 600]

Role of Teaching in the Discipline of Economics

The aspiration of our students is to become a tenure track assistant professor immediately following graduate school.  Most of our students fulfill this desire. Along with research and some degree of service, teaching is an important component of their future jobs. Thus, training them as teachers (as well as researchers) is important both in placing them as well as in performing their jobs immediately after graduate school.

Pedagogical Preparation

Because the majority of our graduates will teach at the university level, and high-quality teaching ability helps on the job market, we require extensive training, specified as follows.

Professional Development - Speaking and Presentation skills

  1. All students who submitted the TOEFL (or IELTS) as part of their application will be informed as to whether they must complete the “Graduate Composition” and “Graduate Listening & Speaking” exams prior to their initial semester.  In addition, these students will be required to take the “ELP Assistant in Instruction exam” after the first year.  Course recommendations may result from these exams, and students must complete these courses as early as possible.
  2. All students whose native language is not English – regardless of whether the TOEFL was taken – must complete U15 ELP 170 “Presentation Skills for the Humanities and Social Sciences,” ideally by the end of the second year of study.
  3. Students whose native language is not English are encouraged to explore other course options in the English Language Programs (ELP) department.
  4. All students should explore teaching, presentation and writing workshops presented by the Teaching Center.  This is particularly true for students ineligible for ELP coursework.  The Teaching Center offers several programs through which students can receive formalized training in teaching pedagogy.
Sequence of Teaching Opportunities for PhD Students

Professional Development – Teaching (MTE)

  1. In general, graduate students must complete 6 semester-long Mentored Teaching Experiences (MTEs), and this generally occurs over years 2, 3 and 4.  Acceptable MTEs include – but are not limited to – serving as an Assistant in Instruction for a class, providing research assistance to a faculty member, or teaching independently (e.g., Econ 493, Econ 494).
  2. If the department or another part of the university requires or authorizes the student to take part in another educational experience as part of her/his studies, then the DGS can reduce the number of required MTEs accordingly.  Every student must have at least two successful MTEs.
  3. The MTE teaching requirement is a condition of graduation with a PhD. Sanctions, such as academic probation, may be imposed if the MTEs are not completed in a timely and effective manner.
  4. Students who entered in the Class of 2015 or earlier:  semesters with Assistant in Instruction or Research Assistant duties will be counted as successful MTEs.
  5. The professional development component of the teaching requirement will consist of “Mentored Teaching Experiences” (MTEs). Students will be allocated slots according to class enrollments, abilities, interest, and other related criteria.
  6. The professional development component of the teaching requirement is met by 6 successful mentored teaching experiences. Usually, without a special dispensation from the DGS, students will have one in each term of the second, third and fourth year.
  7. If the department or another part of the university requires or authorizes the student taking part in another educational experience as part of their studies, then the DGS can reduce the number of required “Mentored Teaching Experiences” accordingly.  Every student must have at least two successful “Mentored Teaching Experiences.”
  8. The DGS shall reduce the number of required monitored teaching experiences for students registered before FL2015. The reduction should be the number of terms the student spent as an Assistant in Instruction or Research Assistant. Recipients of McDonnell and Olin fellowships, who fulfilled their mentored teaching obligation, will be exempt from further teaching duties as well.
  9. The academic coordinator is in charge of coordination of the MTEs.  The coordinator will send out e-mail messages near the beginning of the semester detailing the duties of each student (as in the past).  If a student receives such an e-mail and believes that they are exempt from an MTE that term, the student must contact the DGS and academic coordinator to inform them immediately.  Otherwise, the department will assume that the student is fine with the assignment, and performing the MTE well, will be part of the student’s duties.

Sanctions may be imposed if it is not completed in a timely and effective manner.

Mentored Professional Experience [LGS 603]

currently under review

Education

required number of semesters: 4
updated: 09.2017

Mentored Teaching Experience [LGS 600]

Role of Teaching in the Discipline of Education

Teaching is of paramount importance in the field of education. Since the field is multidisciplinary in nature, our students are trained both within the department and within the various programmatic units with which the department is associated. These include African & African-American Studies, Sociology, American Culture Studies, Psychology, Romance Languages and Literatures, East Asian Languages and Cultures, and Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies. Students are expected to complete mentored teaching experiences (MTEs) as part of their degree requirements and, in consultation with their advisors, may organize and lead course meetings in our department or affiliated programs as an Advanced MTE. Students are mentored in the arts and sciences of teaching by faculty members in the Department of Education and are required to attend two workshops, one each at the beginning of their second and third years, sponsored by the Teaching Center as a matter of the professional development component of their respective programs. They are also encouraged to attend subsequent workshops and are required in the event that the Department deems it necessary to their professional development. In addition, the Department provides travel support for our students to attend the pre-conference professional development workshops of the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association. The pre-conference workshops are facilitated by senior members in the field and are directed at mentoring junior scholars, specifically doctoral students, postdoctoral fellows, and first-year professors, in the areas of teaching, research, and service.

Pedagogical Preparation

Students at the start of their second year are assigned an MTE with a tenured or tenure-line professor in the department. When no satisfactory assignment is available with a tenured/tenure-line member of the department’s faculty, students could be assigned an MTE with a Senior Lecturer or with tenured/tenure-line faculty in another department. During the summer prior to the said MTE, students meet and work with the assigned faculty member to discuss objectives of the course as well as the design of the syllabus and how it serves to facilitate meeting the said objectives. In addition, students are required to participate in a minimum of two workshops sponsored by the Graduate School and the Teaching Center to support them in their capacity as MTEs. Also, as indicated, all students are encouraged, but not required, to attend the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association’s pre-conference workshops that provide leading-edge pedagogical training.
As noted, given that our department represents a field and not a discipline, our students are assigned to courses in area studies, such as African and African-American studies, American culture studies, and women, gender, and sexuality studies, and disciplinary or foundational courses within the field, such as linguistics, history, sociology, and psychology, that reflect the appointments and expertise of the Faculty members in the Department of Education. The assignments provide our students with both breadth in the field of education and depth in their respective areas of specialization. During the first year of the MTE, students are largely responsible for assisting the professor with organizing the syllabus, obtaining materials, and co-grading papers. To be clear, students are not passive observers in this process but are indeed active contributors to these pedagogical processes. Also, a number of our students enter into doctoral studies with master’s degrees and considerable experience teaching undergraduates. Therefore, in certain cases, second-year students (i.e., first-year MTEs) may be given leadership responsibilities (i.e. an Advanced MTE) in courses in which a professor is the instructor of record. Courses in which students serve as the instructor of record or receive compensation cannot be undertaken by students in fulfillment of department MTE requirements. In addition, any compensation students receive as a primary instructor in or outside of the department would fall under Graduate School regulations concerning supplemental work for fellowship recipients. 
During the second year, as indicated below, students are required to organize lectures, assignments, and activities, for no more than four classes of the course for which they are the MTE.
Also as indicated, GS seminars, individual instruction, mentoring, and training with summer support (i.e., co-construction of syllabi for MTEs or individual courses) provide pedagogical training opportunities for our students. Students fulfill basic level teaching requirements by communicating fundamental elements of knowledge and being trained in the basic skills that occur in introductory or lower- level undergraduate courses. As indicated previously, in addition to grading and one-on-one office hours, students are actively involved in providing in-class input during small-group sessions and, in certain instances, leading part or all of the course discussion.
Students in the third year of their program would be reassigned the same MTE courses provided scheduling allows reassignment and that students did not complete both MTEs in program year 2 for the same course. In the reassigned course, MTEs would take on enhanced basic course responsibilities. Enhanced, in this sense, means that students are required to both organize and take the lead on individual class sections. The maximum number of class sections along these lines is four.
The Department also supports the students’ attendance at various regional, national, and international conferences to give co-authored and single-authored talks. In addition, students who are recipients of the various GS fellowships, such as the Chancellor’s Graduate Fellowship, Olin Graduate Fellowship, or competitive external fellowships, give seminar talks. These talks are prepared in close consultation with their departmental advisors. Finally, along these lines, the Department of Education is assessing graduate student needs for career development and implementing a series of workshops to provide them these resources. Course development, instruction, and direct assessment, as well as training on writing teaching philosophy statements, are among the workshops that students requested and that the department plans to implement. Workshops such as these will only enhance graduate students’ mentored teaching experiences and strengthen the department’s courses.

Sequence of Teaching Opportunities for PhD Students

During the second and third years of a student’s program, he, she or they will be paired with a faculty member within the department or an affiliated program as noted above for an MTE. While students are encouraged to complete their MTEs in years 2 and 3, MTEs may be fulfilled in subsequent years. Students that have successfully completed at least two of the four required terms as an MTE and passed the qualifying examination may apply for an Advanced MTE in the department on a topic related to the student’s area of expertise, as defined by the student’s program and qualifying examination. As an Advanced MTE, students may take a principal role in the development of the course topic, syllabus, course organization, office hours and grading for a 100 or 200-level course in which a tenured/tenure-line faculty member is the instructor of record, course collaborator and mentor of a said graduate student. Evidence of success as an MTE should accompany the student’s Advanced MTE application and could include performance assessments from a previous teaching mentor, student feedback on course evaluations, and a statement of support from the students’ advisor. Students may also use as evidence relevant teaching experiences that occurred in other departments or prior to the start of their degree program. Applications for a Fall Advanced MTE will be submitted to the Director of Graduate Studies for consideration by the Department’s Curriculum Committee. 

Mentored Professional Experience [LGS 603]

currently under review

Electrical & Systems Engineering

required number of semesters: 1
updated: 09.2017

Mentored Teaching Experience [LGS 600]

Role of Teaching in the Discipline of Electrical and Systems Engineering

The Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering has two PhD programs, the PhD in Electrical Engineering and a PhD in Systems Science and Mathematics. Both programs aim to educate students for careers in academia, industry, and government.
The ability to clearly express, analyze and communicate interwoven aspects of a complex overall structure is at the heart of any engineering discipline. This ability requires both a mastery of technical skills and the capacity to communicate these skills and procedures in an effective way. Oral communication skills gained in lectures, seminars and other interactive settings such as research discussion groups are therefore important to our graduates.

Pedagogical Preparation

All PhD candidates are required to attend the Teaching Orientation. Due to the small size of the program, teaching instruction and mentoring will be on an individual basis between the student and the instructor of the course for which the student is doing their MTE.

Sequence of Teaching Opportunities for PhD Students

In the Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering classes are taught by faculty, not by graduate students. Some of our introductory undergraduate courses have regularly scheduled accompanying problem sessions or lab exercises that are taught by a graduate student. These provide the required teaching opportunities at the basic level. We will require each PhD student to have at least 14 contact hours of undergraduate teaching. These include giving lectures, conducting discussion and recitation sessions, presentations that introduce and interpret experiments in lab courses, and similar activities. The main courses in our department that have teaching opportunities are ESE 230 "Introduction to Electrical and Electronic Circuits", ESE 317 "Engineering Mathematics" and ESE 326 "Probability and Statistics for Engineering." In addition, many graduate students have mentored teaching experiences in more advanced classes under the direction of faculty. The MTE for one of these courses for one semester will satisfy the basic teaching requirement.

Mentored Professional Experience [LGS 603]

currently under review

Energy, Environmental & Chemical Engineering

required number of semesters: 2-3
updated: 10.2017

Mentored Teaching Experience [LGS 600]

Role of Teaching in the Discipline of Energy, Environmental & Chemical Engineering

The faculty of the Department of Energy, Environmental and Chemical Engineering (EECE) believes that a crucial component in our training of successful scholars is to help every graduate student become an effective teacher. The attributes associated with effective teaching reflect those of good scholarship: the ability to communicate ideas clearly; the distinction between what constitutes acceptable and unacceptable evidence within an intellectual community; the recognition that scholarly endeavors must compete with other, no less worthy, topics of research interest, given the limited resources available (whether those resources are publishing capital or hours in any given semester). The scholar who has received effective training in pedagogy and sufficient experience in front of a class will also become a colleague who ably represents his or her research to a diverse range of audiences. If teaching is not separable from any of our academic tasks, it can be presumed thereby to require special training or experience.

Pedagogical Preparation
  • PhD candidates will have opportunities to serve as an AI for at least two semesters to fulfill the basic level of MTE towards the GS Teaching Requirement Fulfillment in the 2nd-4th year of students’ doctoral program.
  • All PhD students are required to attend one of the MTE-training workshops offered by the Teaching Center prior to or during their first semester as AIs in EECE. This will occur usually in the 2nd year of students’ doctoral program.
  • All PhD candidates shall give at least two formal presentations at the departmental level, university-wide, local level, or at a national or international conference. This can be conducted throughout the entire doctoral program before the students’ final thesis defense.
Sequence of Teaching Opportunities for PhD Students

Central to effective teaching is the communication of knowledge and ideas to others. Our PhD candidates shall gain that experience during their graduate training by receiving formal pedagogical training and satisfying two formal mentored teaching experience (MTE) requirements. The requirements exist at two levels to emphasize differences in communication skills that come with different levels of responsibility:

  1. At the basic level is the communication of fundamental elements of knowledge, or training in basic skills, such as can occur in undergraduate courses or graduate courses. All students must serve as an Assistant in Instruction (AI) in the Department for at least two semesters prior to graduation; in some cases, a student may be asked to have mentored teaching experience in more than two semesters.  The MTE may include, but are not limited to: giving an actual lecture in an undergraduate class with the instructor in attendance, introducing/interpreting laboratory exercises, and conducting formal help sessions before exams.  AIs will also be expected to hold one-on-one office hours and participate in grading homework assignments and exams.  In addition, all PhD candidates are required to attend one of the MTE training workshops offered by the Teaching Center prior to or during their first semester as AIs in EECE.  These workshops provide formal training in instructional techniques and pedagogy.
  2. At the advanced level, the communication concerns deeper ideas and concepts: Their development, evaluation, defense, and formal testing through argumentation or experimentation, such as can occur in graduate seminars or formal discussion groups. Presenting one’s research in formal settings is the best way to fulfill the requirement at this level.  Therefore, all PhD candidates shall give at least two formal presentations at the departmental level, university-wide, local level, or at a national or international conference. Among the presentations, at least one presentation should be oral at a national or international conference.’

Mentored Professional Experience [LGS 603]

currently under review

English

required number of semesters: 5-6
updated: 07.2017

Mentored Teaching Experience [LGS 600]

Role of Teaching in the Discipline of English

Professional development in the teaching of composition and the teaching of literature is an essential component of a PhD in English Literature. Learning how to convey the principles and practices of successful critical analysis and communication is intricately tied to the larger project of training as a literary scholar. Formal support in preparing doctoral students for academic careers as English professors is one aim of our teacher preparation, but not the only aim. Our approach to teacher preparation readies graduate students for long-term engagement in education, communication, and scholarship—both within and outside academia.

Pedagogical Preparation

Each PhD student will learn about pedagogy specific to teaching composition by taking a pedagogy seminar and by engaging in mentored teaching in the College Writing Program (i.e. Writing 1). Each student will have learning experiences related to pedagogy specific to teaching literature by enrolling in an MTE linked to a course in the English Department.  Students are also encouraged to enroll in MTE credits linked to courses outside the English Department in departments or programs relevant to the student’s field of study.

During the first semester in which a student is teaching Writing 1, simultaneous enrollment in a pedagogy seminar is required. This seminar is typically taught jointly by a member of the College Writing Program faculty and a member of the English department. The course focuses on the practical aspects of teaching: graduate students will review their assignments, produce handouts and other material for class, discuss approaches to teaching specific texts, and refine the consistency of their grading of student work. In each semester spent teaching a section of Writing 1, the faculty member who serves as the instructor of record also serves as a mentor for each graduate student. Students should teach two to three iterations of Writing 1 in order to prepare properly for the academic job market, as the majority of positions require the teaching of writing courses.

During MTE semesters associated with literature courses, the student will attend every class, assist with lecture and/or leading discussion, assist with grading, and hold office hours for student meetings. The student will also be required to produce a syllabus for a similar course. The faculty mentor (i.e. the professor teaching the class) will offer feedback on the syllabus as well as feedback on all aspects of course participation. We encourage students to enroll in an MTE with a variety of faculty members, in a variety of courses, in order to be exposed to different teaching styles and to different subject matter at different levels.

In some instances, students will have the opportunity to co-teach a literature course with a member of the English faculty. These students will share equally in the design and teaching of the course, but will also be given extensive feedback by the faculty member who will serve as a teaching mentor for the duration of the course (the student will enroll in MTE credit associated with this course).

In some limited instances, students will have the opportunity independently to teach a literature course. The student will need to have enrolled in an MTE associated with a literature course prior to this teaching experience; the student must also be ABD at the time of teaching. The department has an application for such assignments, including the submission of a potential syllabus. These materials will be reviewed by the department’s Graduate Committee and Curriculum Committee, which provides specific feedback to applicants. If selected to teach, the student is assigned a faculty mentor (typically the dissertation advisor) who will observe the class on 2-3 occasions and provide feedback on class sessions, assignments, and grading. The student will enroll in MTE credit associated with this course.

Sequence of Teaching Opportunities for PhD Students
  • Third Year: MTE (Writing 1) + Pedagogy Seminar / MTE (Writing 1)
  • Fourth Year: MTE (Writing 1 or Literature) / MTE (Literature)
  • Fifth Year: MTE (Literature) / MTE (Literature—Possible Co-teaching/Independent Course)
  • Sixth Year: Dissertation only / Dissertation only

The above represents a typical path, but the sequence of semesters may be changed as deemed productive by students and their advisors, in consultation with the Director of Graduate Studies.

Mentored Professional Experience [LGS 603]

currently under review

German

required number of semesters: 6-8
updated: 06.2017

Mentored Teaching Experience [LGS 600]

Role of Teaching in the Discipline of German

The ability to demonstrate teaching excellence—both with a demonstrated record of stellar teaching and by an on-site teaching demonstration—is now a standard requirement for most jobs in the field of German language, literature, and culture. A scholarship is of course also important, but to be hired in the first place, the candidate must demonstrate that he or she can contribute significantly and expertly to the undergraduate program from the start.  The struggle for German enrollments across the nation does not allow departments to take chances and does not allow the candidate time to learn how to teach on the job.  Moreover, teaching loads at some institutions can amount to as many as seven or eight courses a year. A new assistant professor taking on such a load must be able to hit the ground running and must be able to manage the considerable load that he or she takes on and still find time to do research. In a tight job market, the new PhD may find, furthermore, herself in a visiting appointment for one to two years with significant teaching and service responsibilities. (Postdocs are virtually non-existent in the field of German).
If our students are to remain competitive, they must demonstrate experience teaching German language courses at various levels, to teach so-called content courses in the target language (literature, culture, history, etc.).  Additionally, they must also be prepared to teach literature and culture courses in English (and sometimes teach these in adjacent departments or programs) and to teach writing in English.  They must know how to use technology in the classroom, be well versed in current methods, know how to evaluate and choose textbooks, and be able to converse fluently on all of these subjects.  They must, furthermore, acquire and demonstrate confidence and poise in the classroom and a tempered and reasonable ability to self-evaluate.

Pedagogical Preparation

The Department of Germanic Languages at Washington University prides itself on its reputation for educating graduate students to be superb teachers as well as outstanding scholars.  The Department strives to provide its students with optimal opportunities for preparing for college and university-level teaching through a multi-level teacher training program that includes formal and informal pedagogical training, substantial and intensive MTEs, and immersion in a departmental culture that places significant emphasis on teaching excellence.  All departmental faculty members are engaged at some level in the project of educating our students as teachers, whether as instructors of pedagogy, as heads of teaching teams that include graduate student teaching mentees, as designated teaching mentors, or as unofficial coaches.
Our innovative pedagogical program for graduate students, which consists of both teacher training and professional development, provides teaching mentees extensive experience with both the fundamentals of foreign-language and literary pedagogy and practical classroom application. Pedagogical coursework (apart from the MTEs) stretches over five semesters and amounts to six credits total (GER 5051, 5052, 5053, 5061 and 5062). By the time the students have completed it, they will have had practical experience in a variety of mentored teaching assignments ranging from beginning German to teaching in English outside of their discipline, had an introduction to theories of Second Language Acquisition, learned to think broadly about curriculum and about the position of German departments in colleges and universities, thought about staffing of courses and other pragmatic aspects of undergraduate programs, and will be broadly educated to the requirements of the profession as a whole. They will have also had discussions about the challenges and strategies for teaching a variety of courses with all of the faculty in the German Department (and some outside the German Department).  Moreover, they will have made substantial progress toward assembling a teaching portfolio, which they will need when they enter the job market.

Sequence of Teaching Opportunities for PhD Students

PhD students in the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures are required to complete a minimum of six semesters of MTEs (or the equivalent) in order to be eligible for the degree; most of our students will complete eight semesters of MTEs (the maximum allowable number) in order to prepare themselves for the rigorous demands of the job market in German.

Graduate student pedagogical training and teaching in the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures already take place within a framework that dovetails nicely with both the spirit and requirements of the MTE guidelines as defined by the Graduate School.  Graduate students receive mentored training and teaching experience within larger course teams headed (and in many cases co-taught) by German department faculty.  Our language courses, many of which consist of main sections and subsections, function as apprenticeships for both new and experienced teaching mentees.  Beginning teaching mentees (in their first MTEs) teach subsections, assist in the preparation of course materials, and observe the teaching of faculty and fellow mentees.  As they gain more experience and prove themselves, they are given more responsibility and eventually teach main sections as part of teams that are closely supervised (and often co-taught) by German department faculty.  Course teams meet weekly with their faculty mentors and/or faculty instructors, who provide practical pedagogical instruction, assistance with developing teaching materials and assessment tools, advising on content and student matters, and observation of and feedback regarding each mentee’s teaching.  Over the course of each semester-long MTE, beginning mentees are observed twice and advanced mentees are observed at least once by members of the faculty (in most cases the faculty mentors).  Additionally, MTEs are supplemented by our rigorous and extensive program of pedagogical training.

 

Mentored Professional Experience [LGS 603]

currently under review

History

currently under review

Mentored Teaching Experience [LGS 600]

required number of semesters: 
updated: 12.2017

Mentored Professional Experience [LGS 603]

currently under review

Material Science & Engineering

required number of semesters: 0-2
updated: 09.2017

Mentored Teaching Experience [LGS 600]

Role of Teaching in the Discipline of Material Science & Engineering

The IMSE PhD program in Materials Science and Engineering prepares students for careers conducting research in industry, at national laboratories, and in academia. Our graduates must be able to convey their technical knowledge in a variety of formal and informal settings, and to audiences that will range from novices to experts.

Pedagogical Preparation

As described below, IMSE students will be able to gain the necessary experience via a “traditional” MTE path, working with students in the classroom/laboratory, an “outreach” path, which will engage with learners outside of the classroom/laboratory, or a hybrid. Students wishing to follow the traditional or hybrid paths will be required to attend the annual Teaching Orientation organized by the Teaching Center. In addition, regardless of the path chosen, all students will be required to attend at least two of the interdisciplinary Teaching Center Workshops on teaching topics specifically designed for graduate students.

Sequence of Teaching Opportunities for PhD Students

The IMSE requires that all students complete at least 15 units of teaching. A unit of teaching is broadly defined as an hour spent communicating with a group of students or scholars/learners. Because the IMSE does not offer courses, and WUSTL does not offer an undergraduate degree in Materials Science and Engineering, opportunities for working with students in a classroom or laboratory setting are limited to courses offered by member departments (primarily taught by members of the IMSE Graduate Faculty) with sufficient Materials Science and/or Materials Engineering content. The IMSE, therefore, offers multiple pathways for students to meet the MTE requirement.

For students pursuing a “traditional” MTE path, the required 15 units could be completed by assisting with 1-2 courses:

  • At the undergraduate level, the courses include (but are not limited to) MEMS 3610 (Materials Science) and EECE 305 (Materials Science). Such courses would be well served by IMSE students who are still early in their studies and would provide them with experience teaching materials science concepts to novices.
  • Other materials-focused courses exist in several departments at the graduate/senior undergraduate level (500+), and would be well served by more advanced IMSE students. In particular, courses such as MEMS 5611 (Principles and Methods of Micro and Nanofabrication) and MEMS 5612 (Atomistic Modeling of Materials) would provide good opportunities for IMSE students to teach hands-on skills.

In general, IMSE students who choose to follow the “traditional” MTE path will be assigned to assist with courses where they will engage with the students in recitation/discussion sections, small groups, or laboratory settings. They may also be asked to prepare and present guest lectures. The course instructor will be expected to provide the appropriate mentoring during the MTE, and will provide a summary of the teaching activities and expectations required successful completion of the MTE, prior to the IMSE student being assigned to the course. The mentor will also indicate the total number of teaching units (hours) completed and provide feedback to the student and IMSE Graduate Studies Director at the end of the course.

IMSE students who choose to follow an “outreach” focused MTE path will gain experience working on K-12 or public outreach activities focusing on science, technology, engineering, or math (STEM) and organized by their research advisor, the IMSE, or other campus organizations. Credit will be given for time spent preparing and presenting these activities. Again, the student’s advisor or a representative from the lead organization will be expected to provide the appropriate mentoring during the MTE, and will provide a summary of the teaching activities and expectations required successful completion of the MTE. The mentor will also indicate the total number of teaching units (hours) completed and provide feedback to the student and IMSE Graduate Studies Director at the end of the experience.

In addition to the above opportunities, IMSE students may use the following activities to complete up to 5 units of the teaching requirement:

  • Leading a journal club session
  • Presenting their research in the IMSE or other departmental seminar attended by students and faculty (max 2 units)
  • Presenting their research as a speaker at a professional society or similar national meeting (max 2 units)

Other activities similar to those listed here will be considered for inclusion by the Graduate Studies Director on a case-by-case basis.

In general, students who assist with an entire semester-long course as described for the “traditional” MTE path above will register for LGS 600. Students who pursue the “outreach” focused path will not, since such events will not generally align with the academic calendar. Students who provide guest lectures will also not generally register for LGS 600. However, the number of hours spent on these activities, as well as the additional opportunities listed above (journal club, etc.), will be documented in the student’s file and counted toward the 15 unit requirement.

Mentored Professional Experience [LGS 603]

currently under review

Mathematics & Statistics

required number of semesters: 7
updated: 09.2017

Mentored Teaching Experience [LGS 600]

Role of Teaching in the Discipline of Mathematics         

At most major universities, mathematics is a service discipline that teaches a majority of credit hours.  Effective instruction in mathematics courses is of fundamental importance not only to our discipline, but also to the sciences (physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering).
Upon completion of their degree, many of our graduates go on to academic positions.  Our Graduate Program wants them to receive adequate preparation in teaching and instructional methodology so that they will be effective in the classroom at Washington University - St. Louis as well as be able to start their new positions with success.

Pedagogical Preparation

The department pedagogical preparation consists of three one-credit semester courses taken over a period of three semesters.  These courses are taught by the Faculty in the department.   Topics covered during the course include pedagogical issues of teaching, both general and those specific to mathematics, and administrative issues associated with teaching.  Campus resources such as CornerStone are utilized for additional information about effective teaching methodology.  A key component of the course is that students must prepare a “mock” calculus lecture that is presented during the course and constructive feedback is provided.  Student presentations are recorded so they can be critiqued and further comments can be provided.  Students additionally serve as Assistant to the Instructor starting during their second year; mentoring by the faculty member responsible for the course takes place.

Sequence of Teaching Opportunities for PhD Students

The Mathematics Department provides a planned sequence of teaching opportunities.  During the students' second year of studies, they begin service in the Calculus help sessions. Starting in their third year, they take on a more active teaching opportunity by serving as an Assistant to the Instructor for the calculus classes; the enrollment of these courses is typically in the 15-30 student range.  Graduate students are assigned two or three sections of calculus to assist with.  The Graduate Student meets with the calculus students one time per week. 
To help students improve their presentation skills the program and Department provide several opportunities.  There are two oral exams as part of the degree (a major and minor oral); in these oral exams, they present some work on research topics that they will pursue.  Students also speak in the Graduate Student Seminar and in the specialized research seminars in the Department; these are more specialized talks with a smaller audience.  In their last year of studies, students are encouraged to attend and speak at conferences where they are exposed to a wider community.  Graduate Students also have the opportunity to give a presentation in the Washington University - St. Louis Math Circle.  The Math Circle meets every Sunday with a dozen or more middle school students.  The level is elementary, but a challenging teaching experience and a great way for the Graduate Student to learn to teach mathematics.

Mentored Professional Experience [LGS 603]

currently under review

Mechanical Engineering

required number of semesters: 1-3
updated: 07.2017

Mentored Teaching Experience [LGS 600]

Pedagogical Preparation

We will require students participating in MTE for the first time to attend the annual Teaching Orientation organized by the Teaching Center. In addition, each candidate will be required to attend at least one of the interdisciplinary Teaching Workshops on teaching topics specifically designed for graduate students organized by the Teaching Center.

Sequence of Teaching Opportunities for PhD Students

The culture in the School of Engineering is that graduate and undergraduate classes are taught by faculty rather than graduate students. Nonetheless, it is important that our PhD students have opportunities to teach. We will require each PhD student to have at least 14 hours of contact time in undergraduate teaching situations and 4 hours of contact time in graduate teaching situations. The following opportunities will be afforded for the students to engage in these activities.

Teaching at Basic Level
  • teaching students in grade school and high school about science and engineering
  • (for example, in the G K-12 program that we operate)
  • giving lectures in undergraduate classes
  • conducting discussion sessions in undergraduate classes
  • conducting recitation sessions in undergraduate classes
  • giving lectures in laboratory courses that introduce or interpret the experiments
  • running help sessions in which the graduate student explains the background and methodology of engineering approaches
Teaching at Advanced Level
  • teaching lectures in graduate classes
  • giving seminars and presentations to research groups
  • giving seminars and presentations to other students and faculty (for example, the thesis proposal or thesis defense)
  • presenting papers at conferences
  • giving lectures in advanced undergraduate classes
  • running an advanced laboratory experience

In addition to the above, each PhD student will be assigned a specific faculty member to guide and mentor that PhD student in his or her assignments in specific courses. Regular meetings will occur between the PhD student and the mentor to evaluate progress and suggest pedagogical improvements that can be made in course assignments. These regular meetings will also be used to discuss PhD student performance as determined from feedback by students (both direct and through class evaluations) in order to make suggestions for improvements to teaching effectiveness.

 

Mentored Professional Experience [LGS 603]

currently under review

Movement Sciences

required number of semesters: 1
updated: 09.2017

Mentored Teaching Experience [LGS 600]

Role of Teaching in the Discipline of Movement Sciences

The Movement Science Program mission, goals, and objectives related to teaching are that each student demonstrates excellence in didactic teaching and presentation of scientific presentations.

  1. Communicate a philosophy of teaching that embodies a commitment to the improvement of professional practice and research through excellence in teaching and mentoring.
  2. Demonstrate sound strategies of planning, delivery, and evaluation of teaching encounters at a basic level (minimum of 14 hours) and an advanced level (minimum of 4 hours).
  3. Continually seek to improve teaching strategies in response to self-reflection, peer input, and student feedback.

Evaluation strategies:  Faculty mentor evaluation of the performance of scientific presentations, self-assessment and student feedback during the required MSP “Teaching Practicum”.

Pedagogical Preparation
Goal 1: College-based Classroom Teaching: 
  1. Students are required to attend a minimum of 3 of the graduate student teaching workshops offered by the Teaching Center at Washington University.
  2. Teaching Practicum: L63 IPMS 5210, 2 credits. Doctoral students will choose an appropriate course within the Program in Physical Therapy for which they will participate in mentored teaching experience. The course decision is to be made with the full support of the doctoral student’s primary doctoral mentor and course coordinator of the chosen course. The doctoral student will be mentored by the course master of chosen course and the course master of the Teaching Practicum. The duties required of the doctoral student during the mentored teaching experience will include all aspects of course coordination to include:
      1.  Formal classroom lecture presentation (and lab if appropriate) of a Unit of material within the course.  The unit to be taught will be determined and agreed upon by the doctoral student, student’s graduate mentor, and course master.  The doctoral student is to prepare all handouts for the unit and must comply with copyright law.
      2. Review and preparation of the course syllabus to include course text adoption, reading assignments, grading policies etc.  It is expected that the doctoral students familiarize themselves with the guidelines for syllabus preparation through information from the Teaching Center’s web site. link
      3. Review and preparation of course objectives and development of specific learning objectives to accompany the unit taught by a student. It is expected that the doctoral students familiarize themselves with the principles of developing and writing learning objectives through information on the Teaching Center’s web site or other educational sources.
      4. Offering of help or review session
      5. Assistance with grading (if appropriate) and review of exam results
      6. Posting of appropriate course materials on the course web site in a timely manner
      7. Review of course feedback and suggestion for course revisions
      8. Assistance with all aspects of course management as requested by course master
Goal 2: Communication of Scientific Information

All doctoral students are expected to complete each of the following experiences in the presentation of scientific information.

  • Formal presentation of research Specific Aims in Program Seminar course (L63 IPMS 5850)
  • Discussion Leader for two Lab research meetings
  • Defense of Study Proposal as a component of the Qualifying Exam
  • Present one data-driven research seminar during the Program Research Seminar
  • Present either a poster or platform talk at a National Meeting
Sequence of Teaching Opportunities for PhD Students
Goal 1: Classroom Teaching

All aspects of classroom teaching are to be completed during the first three years of the doctoral program.

  1. Attendance at workshops conducted by The Teaching Center: To be completed over the course of the first 1-3 academic years in the student’s doctoral program.  Completed certificates should be copied and converted to a pdf file.
  2. Teaching Practicum Course: To be completed in academic year 2 or 3 of the student’s doctoral training.  Doctoral students should meet with the course coordinator and begin the duties of the mentored teaching experience 1-3 months prior to the start of the course.

A record of all completed aspects of Goal 1 [Teaching Practicum (L63-5210) and certificates from The Teaching Center] will be reported to the course coordinator for the Teaching Practicum.

Goal 2: Communication of Scientific Information

Presentation Timeline

  • Formal presentation of research Specific Aims in Program Seminar course years 1 or 2
  • Discussion Leader for two separate Lab research meetings years 1, 2, or 3
  • Defense of Study Proposal as a component of the qualifying exam fall, year 3
  • Present one research seminar during the Program Research Seminar, years 3 or 4
  • Present either a poster or platform talk at a National Meeting, years 3 or 4

A record of all completed aspects of Goal 2 will be reported to the course coordinator for the Teaching Practicum.
Final documentation for successful completion of teaching requirement, goals 1 and 2 will be reported by the coordinator of the teaching practicum to the Director of the Movement Science Program.
A completed department teaching/training plan will be sent to the Teaching and Professional Development Committee (attention, Associate Dean). Following administrative approval, a final copy of the departmental teaching/training plan will be placed on file in the Department and The Graduate School offices.  This plan will serve as the basis for the Director of Graduate Study to report that an individual PhD student has satisfactorily completed the Graduate School teaching requirement for PhD students to The Graduate School office.

Mentored Professional Experience [LGS 603]

currently under review

Music

required number of semesters: 8
updated: 07.2017

Mentored Teaching Experience [LGS 600]

Role of Teaching in the Discipline of Music

Virtually all musicologists and music theorists teach in some capacity. Most of our graduate students hope to teach at the university level. Depending on where they gain employment in this capacity, they could work with a range of students, from conservatory students preparing for professional careers in music performance or education to liberal arts students taking music courses to fulfill humanities requirements. Interviews for university positions almost always include a teaching demonstration. In the past decade or so, musicologists and music theorists have increasingly given the study of pedagogy a prominent place at national conferences and in peer-reviewed journals.
Pedagogy remains an important aspect of training for graduate students who go on to work outside the academy. Working for a museum, library, or arts organization, for example, requires a scholar to engage with the public—and, in many cases, colleagues with different disciplinary backgrounds—as an educator.

Pedagogical Preparation

All musicology and music theory graduate students begin their first year by taking Music 501 and 502—Introduction to Musicological Research I and II. These seminars explore a variety of issues, including pedagogy. Training includes discussions of specific issues (textbook selection, for example, teaching “difficult” topics, designing discussion questions, and different approaches to survey courses) and mock lectures. The second semester culminates with students designing an original syllabus.

Sequence of Teaching Opportunities for PhD Students

Beginning in their second year, graduate students receive MTE assignments each semester. In all, students will teach for four or five of their six years—they forego teaching their first year and have the opportunity to forego teaching during their fifth or sixth year in order to focus on dissertation work. The latter opportunity is not given automatically: in order to take a year off of teaching assignments, a student must submit a proposal to the chair, division head, and director of graduate studies during the previous semester explaining how s/he will use this time. (Uses could include travel for archival research or fieldwork, intensive writing, etc.) Mentored Teaching Experiences are those in which students are mentored by a faculty member. In all cases, graduate students give a minimum of two lectures over the course of the semester and participate in grading. Graduate students assigned to courses in the music theory sequence also lead one or two musicianship labs, and graduate students in any course may be required to meet with undergraduates outside of class as needed. Because of the flexibility of the “MTE” category, however, we are open to students fulfilling their teaching requirements through other means—teaching outside of our department or beyond Washington University, for example. If a student would like to pursue such an opportunity, s/he must submit a proposal to the chair, division head, and director of graduate studies the previous semester.
Ideally, a student’s teaching experience in our department will culminate with an opportunity to teach his/her own course as the instructor of record. This experience will satisfy one of the required semesters of MTE work. We will extend this opportunity only to students who are making satisfactory progress in the program and who are able to design and teach a course that complements our current undergraduate offerings. Students seeking to pursue this opportunity must submit a course proposal to the chair, division head, and director of graduate studies no less than one academic year in advance. (This course proposal can be based on the syllabus the student-designed for Music 502.) The departmental “home” for this course can vary: students with Harvey Fellowships, for example, are required to teach a course for AMCS, which would simultaneously fulfill this part of Music’s graduate program.

Mentored Professional Experience [LGS 603]

currently under review

Nursing Science

to be announced

Mentored Teaching Experience [LGS 600]

Mentored Professional Experience [LGS 603]

Performing Arts

required number of semesters: 0
updated: 09.2017

Mentored Teaching Experience [LGS 600]

Role of Teaching in the Discipline of Performing Arts

Teaching and teacher preparation is important in Theater and Performance Studies.

Mentored Professional Experience [LGS 603]

currently under review

Philosophy

required number of semesters: 4
updated: 09.2017

Mentored Teaching Experience [LGS 600]

Role of Teaching in the Discipline of Philosophy
Teaching is central to philosophy. The practice of philosophy has required dialogue with other practitioners and novices for about 2400 years, and there is no way to teach philosophy except by teaching the doing of philosophy. So education in philosophy is unavoidably an education in how to engage others in philosophical inquiry. The PhD in philosophy is an essential qualification for teaching university and college courses. So it is important to offer specific training to help young philosophers begin to learn how to engage others in philosophical inquiry in the specific formats that universities and colleges impose, where that is consistent with their educational and professional goals.
Pedagogical Preparation

We have Department teaching training for all persons in the graduate program who are participating in Mentored Teaching Experiences (MTEs) in a given year. At this workshop (or sometimes workshops), we discuss a range of pedagogical challenges and the strategies one can use to meet those challenges. We discuss both the specific challenges of assisting a faculty member and those of teaching one's own course.

Among the topics we discuss: how to conceive of the goals of the course and to coordinate them with the syllabus, the assignments, and the class sessions; how to devise a successful syllabus; the variety of assignments one can use and their various pedagogical advantages and disadvantages (reader reports, small-group work, assigned questioning or discussion-leading duties, outlines, brief essays, longer essays, quizzes, pop quizzes, exams), as well as their connection to different larger aims the course might have; how to generate and lead discussion, how to structure and deliver a lecture (and how to use aids such as PowerPoint and the blackboard), and how to mix the two; how to prepare for a class (emphasizing the importance not merely of preparing the material but preparing how to convey the material, by selecting some of the many possible points or aims one could have); how to mark essays effectively; and how to avoid or deal with some potential problems (implicit bias, romantic entanglement, plagiarism.

In addition, faculty members meet with, and provide support to, the graduate students whom they are mentoring in teaching.
During the year, the director of graduate studies collects evaluations from the faculty of all of our graduate students teaching every semester, and raises the question of teaching at the annual review of graduate students, so that the department provides organized, formal feedback, to reinforce the mentoring graduate students that receive from the workshops and professors.  With an eye on the graduate student's eventual job applications, which will require a letter of reference focused on their teaching abilities, we encourage each student to work closely with a member of the faculty to seek advice on planning courses and to have a faculty member observe their teaching when they conduct a class or if they independently teach a course. Several other requirements in the graduate program bear on the teaching skills of our graduate students. Most obviously, we require each graduate student to take seminars in which they make presentations, and we require each student to deliver a colloquium to the whole department. Last but by no means least, we encourage that our graduate students earn the Teaching Center's Teaching Citation.

Sequence of Teaching Opportunities for PhD Students
Teaching requirements for the PhD normally consist of 4 semesters of MTE over a six-year graduate career. This normally consists in MTEs in each semester of years two and three or three and four. In addition, we support our students in seeking other (normally paid but un-mentored) teaching experience locally, including at University College.
 

Mentored Professional Experience [LGS 603]

currently under review

Physics

required number of semesters:2
updated: 06.2017

Mentored Teaching Experience [LGS 600]

Role of Teaching in the Discipline of Physics

The ability to communicate clearly both orally and in writing is crucial for all physicists. We view preparation in teaching as a vital component in learning to communicate well. Communication takes many forms, such as lecturing, individual instruction, leading and participating in the discussion, and advocacy. Whether a new PhD is in a postdoctoral fellowship, a teaching position, or a research position in industry or a national laboratory, (s)he will find that teaching experience of all types is crucial for success.

Pedagogical Preparation

All entering graduate students are required to enroll in Physics 597, Supervised Teaching of Physics, as preparation for their Mentored Teaching Experience. In Physics 597, first-year graduate students are instructed in current education pedagogical techniques through reading, discussion, and application through work in the introductory physics laboratories. The discussion section meets for one hour a week and introduces many aspects of effective pedagogy. Each student in Physics 597 is paired with an experienced lab mentor for one lab section per week of an introductory physics lab. The 597 students work individually or in small groups with undergraduate students. Twice during the semester, they complete self-evaluations. The mentors also evaluate their application of the pedagogical ideas from class to teaching, as well as their goals and their strategy for accomplishing them. Students with substantial teaching experience who have received a Master’s degree prior to entering the program may petition the graduate studies committee to be excused from this requirement.

Sequence of Teaching Opportunities for PhD Students

After completion of Physics 597, graduate students have a two-semester Mentored Teaching Experience. There are a variety of classes available, and every effort is made to match graduate student interests and abilities to their class. Introductory labs (two sections per week) offer the most contact time. Advanced labs and leadership in the introductory labs require outstanding skills and a substantial commitment to physics teaching. The Mentored Teaching Experience often involves maintaining office hours, leading help sessions, preparing homework assignments and solution sets, and grading homework. During the Mentored Teaching Experience, graduate students are also encouraged to present a lecture in the class with which they are connected.
The Physics Department requires at least four additional hours of teaching in the form of more specialized oral presentation, which is usually done after the Mentored Teaching Experience. There are many opportunities to meet this requirement. Students often present in group meetings and journal clubs, and there is a weekly graduate seminar where graduate students present their research to their peers (not open to faculty). By the time they finish their doctorates, most students will have presented their work at one or more professional meetings. The department also accepts certain outreach activities sponsored by the department as meeting the requirement. A form detailing how the requirement was completed is submitted to the Graduate Studies Committee after being signed by the student and his or her advisor.

Mentored Professional Experience [LGS 603]

currently under review

Political Science

currently under review

Mentored Teaching Experience [LGS 600]

required number of semesters:
updated: 09.2017

Mentored Professional Experience [LGS 603]

currently under review

Psychological & Brain Sciences

required number of semesters: 2-8
updated: 09.2017

Mentored Teaching Experience [LGS 600]

Role of Teaching in the Discipline of Psychological & Brain Sciences

Teaching and teaching preparation play a very important role in our discipline. Most individuals who obtain academic positions in Psychological & Brain Sciences are expected to be at least minimally effective teachers and to teach at least one – and typically more than one – undergraduate class. In addition, many individuals in Psychological & Brain Sciences will obtain positions in institutions with graduate programs, and will thus be expected to participate effectively in mentoring and teaching graduate students. Further, being able to communicate effectively to audiences with either similar knowledge or less knowledge than one has about one’s field is essential to being a successful scientist in Psychological & Brain Sciences. As such, core preparation in pedagogical skills combined with some practical experience in this arena is considered critical elements of graduate education.

Pedagogical Preparation

All students are required to take an intensive three-week pedagogical teaching course at the end of their first year (or second year if specific conflicts occur). This course titled – Teaching of Psychology (Psych 565) is taught every May. This course covers a wide range of topics relevant for being an effective teacher and includes the requirement to prepare, present, and receive detailed feedback on two lectures from the course instructor (typically Mike Strube) as well as to prepare a teaching philosophy statement.

Students are informed about the additional workshops offered through the Teaching Center, or organized specifically for Psychological & Brain Sciences students as part of the Psychological & Brain Sciences Graduate Student Brown Bag Series.

Sequence of Teaching Opportunities for PhD Students
Mentored Teaching Experience

Students must have a Mentored Teaching Experience and be enrolled in the MTE course (LGS 600) for 2-8 semesters, and no less than two semesters during the course of their program, with most doing so in years 2-4(5) of the program. Students may select from the following:

  1. MTE for a section of Experimental Psychology, in which the graduate student is responsible for organizing and presenting the laboratory sections.  The Instructor of the Experimental course will supervise the graduate student.  The course instructor will observe at least one session conducted by the graduate student and provide written feedback to the graduate student.
  2. MTE for a core introductory course in Psychological & Brain Sciences, and offer an optional discussion section every other week. The graduate student will be responsible for organizing and presenting materials in the discussion section.  In addition, the graduate student must prepare and give at least one lecture in the course. The Instructor of the course will supervise the graduate student. The Instructor will observe at least one of the discussion sections lead by the graduate student as well as the course lecture given by the graduate student, and provide written feedback to the graduate student. Faculty teaching introductory courses will support graduate students in fulfilling this MTE requirement in their introductory course.
  3. MTE for the graduate level statistics course (a two-semester course), in which the graduate student is responsible for organizing and presenting laboratory sections. The Instructor of the graduate statistics course will supervise the graduate student. The course instructor will observe at least one laboratory session or one lecture conducted by the graduate student and provide written feedback to the graduate student.
  4. MTE for the graduate level assessment course, in which the graduate student is responsible for organizing and presenting laboratory sections. The Instructor of the assessment course will supervise the graduate student. The course instructor will observe at least one laboratory session or one lecture conducted by the graduate student and provide written feedback to the graduate student.

In addition, students must give regular presentations in departmental brown bags, seminars, or lab meetings, and/or at local or national conferences. Regular is defined as at least once a year, starting in their second year of the graduate program.
As students complete one of the above teaching experiences, they must forward a copy of the feedback form, from the observing instructor to the Administrative Assistant to the DGS for placement in their student file. Once all requirements have been fulfilled, which is sometime after 2-8 successful MTEs as assessed by the DGS in conjunction with the mentoring instructors, notification will be sent to Graduate School office that this requirement has been met. After this, it is at the student’s discretion whether they would like to continue to receive feedback. Instructors will provide training and feedback as requested.

Teaching Experience

Students who have completed at least two MTEs and would like to gain more independent teaching experience may elect to teach their own course. This could be a summer course, a Psych 102 Seminar: Introduction to Psychology during the academic year, or in University College. In all cases, students are teaching to gain pedagogical experience as part of their graduate education program. If the graduate student wishes, they may request a faculty member in Psychological & Brain Sciences to attend one of their lectures and provide written or verbal feedback.
Each student’s teaching ability and interest will be assessed and they are selected by the Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUS) in conjunction with the student’s mentor to teach a class for instructor training and education in preparing for their career. Selected students must attend a workshop at the Teaching Center on how to lead discussions and meet with Dr. Len Green (DUS) before the class begins, throughout the semester and an end-of-course session to discuss aspects of teaching. 
Students hired for these positions are considered part-time lecturers by the department (or University College) and are financed by the department (or University College) and are subject to the collective bargaining agreement of the adjunct union. Eligible students will continue to receive their university fellowship during this period. However, because students are employed as part-time lecturers or instructors, the part-time employment policy is in effect.
We actively discourage students from teaching as a mechanism of financial support as opposed to gaining teaching experience and preparation for teaching.

Mentored Professional Experience [LGS 603]

currently under review

Public Health

no information

Mentored Teaching Experience [LGS 600]

Mentored Professional Experience [LGS 603]

Rehabilitation & Participation Sciences

required number of semesters: 1
updated: 09.2017

Mentored Teaching Experience [LGS 600]

Role of Teaching in the Discipline of Rehabilitation and Participation Sciences

Teaching, as viewed along a continuum (from a 1:1 clinician-client therapy session through community health education), is at the heart of occupational therapy and rehabilitation. Academicians in rehabilitation and participation science will need preparation for a wide range of educator roles, including classroom teaching, student mentoring, laboratory staff training, and client/research participant education. 

Pedagogical Preparation

All RAPS students take the Teaching Practicum course, a 2-credit seminar covering a variety of topics and skills necessary for success as an academic educator, including learning theories, educational philosophies, instructional design, goal-writing and assessment, course/curriculum design, and mentoring students.  Students develop a personal statement of philosophy of teaching and learning and must also complete a mentored teaching experience in the Program in Occupational Therapy either in the concurrent or a subsequent semester.  Students are also encouraged to take advantage of workshops offered through The Teaching Center on the Danforth campus.

Sequence of Teaching Opportunities for PhD Students

RAPS students must complete at least one mentored teaching experience in either the same semester as they take the Teaching Practicum seminar or in a subsequent semester.

Mentored Professional Experience [LGS 603]

currently under review

Romance Languages

required number of semesters: 6-8
updated: 09.2017

Mentored Teaching Experience [LGS 600]

Role of Teaching in the Discipline of Romance Languages

Teaching is fundamental in Romance Languages since virtually all our PhD students intend to become college professors. Therefore, teacher preparation is at the heart of our program. Our students take at least one pedagogy course and teach various courses during six (for students arriving with an MA) or eight semesters (for students arriving without an MA). They start teaching during their third semester.

Pedagogical Preparation

The Teaching Development Program has five phases.
Teaching Orientation for beginning graduate MTE instructors. This is an intensive one-week program in August prior to the opening of classes.
Graduate Seminar in Methods of Teaching Romance Languages. A required one-semester course that runs concurrently with supervised lower-level language teaching. Seminar topics may include an overview of second language acquisition theories; historical and contemporary teaching methodologies; integration of technology into curriculum; issues in testing and assessment.

Sequence of Teaching Opportunities for PhD Students

Supervised lower-level language teaching. All first-year students participating in a Mentored Teaching Experience are team members of multi-sectioned courses under faculty supervision. This includes observations, consultations, video filming, and written commentary.
Teaching Practice. Mid-career graduate students have exposure to teaching at several levels, primarily in multi-sectioned courses. At all times, graduate students work under faculty supervision with frequent consultation. They have opportunities to plan curricular units, develop tests, evaluate students, and begin teaching literary texts.
Annual Instructional Methods Workshop. The language and literature departments offer a workshop for graduate students, often presented by a national figure in language instructional methods.
In addition, interested graduate students can earn a graduate certificate in Language Instruction. It is an interdisciplinary certificate related to the fields of applied linguistics, second language acquisition, psychology, neuroscience, and other disciplines that have important implications for the way foreign languages are taught.
All students teach one class per semester for three or four years. They have opportunities to teach at all levels in the language, including 307 and 308. Students typically start with introductory language, then intermediate and end with advanced composition and grammar. In French, most advanced graduate students can also teach one “preceptorial” for a 400-level literature seminar (a discussion section for undergraduates meeting one hour per week). In Spanish, advanced students may be eligible to teach survey literature and culture course.

Mentored Professional Experience [LGS 603]

currently under review

Social Work

no information at this time

Mentored Teaching Experience [LGS 600]

Mentored Professional Experience [LGS 603]

Speech & Hearing

required number of semesters: 2
updated: 06.2017

Mentored Teaching Experience [LGS 600]

Role of Teaching in the Discipline of Speech and Hearing

The Speech and Hearing (PhD) program prepares students for academic and research careers in speech and hearing sciences.  Teaching experiences are designed to prepare PhD students to become effective teachers and communicators of their discipline and their intellectual research endeavors.  Objectives of these teaching experiences include: providing students with adequate breadth and depth of teaching experiences, providing faculty mentoring, and enhancing the overall training for PhD students.

Pedagogical Preparation

The Teaching Center’s orientation must be completed before students will be allowed to begin fulfilling the formal teaching requirements. Participation in additional learning opportunities offered through The Teaching Center will be optional.  A faculty mentor will work closely with PhD students throughout each Mentored Teaching Experience.

Sequence of Teaching Opportunities for PhD Students
  • Students will be required to complete one semester of Mentored Teaching Experience (MTE) at the introductory level. Students will work closely with a faculty mentor to develop a plan that will broaden teaching experiences, develop teaching skills and meet the MTE requirement, with regular feedback and assessment over the course of the semester.  Typically, these experiences are completed via SHS 234: Introduction to Speech and Hearing Sciences, but opportunities will be discussed and decided upon by the mentor and student. The student will provide a written summary of the teaching experiences at the end of each semester of enrollment.
  • Students will be required to complete one semester of Mentored Teaching Experience (MTE) at the advanced level. Students will work closely with a faculty mentor to develop a plan that will broaden teaching experiences, develop teaching skills and meet the MTE requirement, with regular feedback and assessment over the course of the semester. Typically, these experiences are completed via coursework offered in the Doctor of Audiology (Au.D.) and/or Master of Science in Deaf Education (M.S.D.E.) program, depending on the student's background and interests, but opportunities will be discussed and decided upon by the mentor and student. The student will provide a written summary of the teaching experiences at the end of each semester of enrollment.

Mentored Professional Experience [LGS 603]

currently under review

Writing

required number of semesters: 3
updated: 08.2017

Mentored Teaching Experience [LGS 600]

Role of Teaching in the Discipline of Writing

Professional development in creative writing and literary pedagogy allows our MFA students to implement their developing skills in writing craft, close reading, verbal expression, and written criticism. Our students engage with their faculty mentors and each other, as well as with their students of diverse backgrounds and levels of experience. The Writing Program considers this professional development and classroom teaching experience to be an essential part of our students’ development as writers, critical thinkers, and educators.

Pedagogical Preparation

Students will teach one section of a 200 level creative writing course (fiction/nonfiction/poetry) in the fall and spring semesters of their second year. A faculty mentor will be assigned to each student and will provide feedback during both semesters of teaching. In addition, each semester the program will hold several peer-review sessions so that students can learn from each other, share insights, and enhance their courses with input from others. Faculty mentors will be present at these peer review sessions. 

Sequence of Teaching Opportunities for PhD Students

First Year:

First Year students are given several opportunities to observe undergraduate courses being taught by faculty and second-year MFA students (they are required observe at least one 200-level and have the option to observe a 300-level or 400 level course).
In May, first-year students are required to attend a one-week pedagogy seminar. The seminar covers syllabus preparation, course texts, grading creative work, creating useful craft exercises, and the dynamics of the classroom unique to creative writing workshops. Students prepare a rough syllabus to be peer-reviewed with other students at the end of the week.
In August, students turn in their completed syllabi to the director of the writing program for review.  A review session of the pedagogy seminar is held in late August before classes begin.
Second Year:

First Semester:

  • Students teach a 200-level course in their genre (fiction/nonfiction/poetry). All students are assigned a faculty member who will schedule classroom visits, provide feedback, and meet with students individually.
  • Students meet with members of their cohort and the director of the writing program twice during the semester to review teaching strategies, compare notes, and share teaching strategies, successful exercises, etc.
  • Students are observed in the classroom by the director of the writing program or a senior faculty member in their genre, followed by an in-person review.

Second Semester:

  • Students teach a 200-level course in their genre (fiction/nonfiction/poetry). All students are assigned a faculty member who will schedule classroom visits, provide feedback, and meet with students individually. 

Students meet with members of their cohort and the director of the writing program twice during the semester to review teaching strategies, compare notes, and share teaching strategies, successful exercises, etc.

Mentored Professional Experience [LGS 603]

currently under review